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Posts Tagged ‘Talent Management’

By Rich Mesch

Way back in April of 2010, I wrote this post about talking learning to business, where I basically posited that business doesn’t value learning, it values performance. I recently saw a wonderful presentation by ROI guru Jack Phillips at the Training 2011 conference that provided data to support that assumption. The bad news? Businesses really don’t value learning. The good news? Once we understand what business does value, we can take steps to provide it.

See, businesses don’t value learning any more than the driver of a car values gasoline. The driver of a car has a goal; he wants to get somewhere. He has a resource for getting there, the car. And in order for the car to take him where he wants to go, he puts gasoline in it. Having a full tank of gas is not a goal; getting somewhere is the goal, and the gasoline is the fuel that makes the car go, and allows the driver to get where he’s going.

So, too, do businesses want to get somewhere. And skills and knowledge are the fuel that power the people of the business and allow them to take the business where it needs to go. So it’s not too surprising that businesses don’t measure learning; they measure results.

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by Reni Gorman

I have been designing and delivering learning interventions for nearly 20 years (dare I say), and I always tell my clients that the learning intervention is just the start of creating change in behavior. There are many other components and models but I boil it down to the most necessary:

1. Goal setting—people need to know what is expected of them. Sounds simple? Too simple? I agree and yet many people do not even consider it. I have seen this assumption so many times. We as learning professionals know better than to make assumptions. Help your clients check their assumptions! All you have to do is randomly ask a couple of learners. If goals are not clear then depending on the level of behavior change needed you can address it multiple ways:

  • The easiest and the simplest is a communication strategy and plan, however that is only for simple changes, like learning to use new software.
  • If, on the other hand, you are changing your sales model, a pretty important and difficult change, you need a change management strategy and plan.
  • Finally if you are totally reengineering the way people work because of, for example, a merger (not uncommon these days) then you need a new or adjusted performance management strategy and plan in addition to a change management strategy and plan.

 

2.  Learning intervention—I think we all have this one down!

3. Reinforcement and feedback—As we all know, learning is a process, not an event. Therefore, there always has to be some reinforcement and feedback to truly affect performance. This could manifest in: (more…)

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by Sherry Engel

 

I’ve struggled the last month or so to write a blog entry, trying to find that topic that “hits home”.  I want to blog about things that are truly important and meaningful to me. This weekend, through my own personal journey of growth in my faith, I discovered a great correlation between my personal journey for knowledge and the journey of those I help in corporate America.. 

I’ve been on a mission to learn and grow spiritually. I’ve been completing all of the “normal” learning activities….listening to teachings, reading, etc. However, as I reflect on my journey for knowledge, I find what has provided the most value for me are the discussions and sharing I have with my personal mentor. So why is it that a mentor carries so much value in my spiritual growth and how can we correlate that with learning in Corporate America?

Here’s what I’ve found:

My mentor is someone….

  • I trust won’t “think I’m stupid”, when I “ask the stupid question” 
  • I can bounce my ideas off of 
  • Who’s further along in their level of knowledge, so helps me to “stretch” to their level 
  • I can share the joy of my newfound learning with 
  • Who can encourage me when I feel like “I just can’t do it” 
  • Who helps me to personalize my learnings to my specific situation

 Look at those!  Wouldn’t it be great if we had a personal mentor in all aspects of our life?

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by Reni Gorman and Rich Mesch

 

55 and Older Execs Don’t Like Training

Reni: I read an article on The Economist titled: Executive education and the over-55s: Never too old to learn. The focus was about the trend that older executives are shunning corporate training. The reason? To put it bluntly: They are sick and tired of going and sitting in training. Why? Many assume they will not learn anything earth shattering, while others just don’t have the patience/time away from their job. Training has to be “worth it”. The article goes on to discuss what does work, one being sending executives to prestigious schools. They won’t go to internal training, but they will go to external training at reputable institutions. Why? Probably because they feel like they will really learn. So, it is not really that they don’t like learning, rather they don’t like corporate training.

The Generational Lie

Rich: I attended several learning conferences this year, and at each one, I heard some variation on this message: it’s time to get past old school training models, because the generation of 20-somethings entering the work force don’t learn that way. We need social media for the 20-somethings,  because that’s how they learn. We need virtual environments for the 20-somethings, because that’s how they learn.  And every time, I wanted to scream from the back of the room, “HEY! I’M A 40-SOMETHING, AND I LEARN THAT WAY, TOO!”

Where on earth did we get the notion that because employees of a certain age have greater exposure to “traditional” learning methods that we like it better? Or that we’re somehow resistant or techno-phobic? Every generation has its share of resisters, but most of us like trying new things, and we especially like making good use of our time and being successful.

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by Dawn Francis, Ed.D.

Coaching is one of my favorite topics to research and discuss. That might surprise you since I’ve written the majority of my blog entries on transformative learning; however, there’s a distinct synergy between the two. Think of coaching as an enabler of the transformative learning process. Coaching can be a catalyst for personal perspective transformation.

Yet, the focus here is firmly on coaching—more specifically, the coach. My manager asked me yesterday to share my opinion on why some individuals don’t make effective coaches. I cited the propensity some people have to “tell” versus “ask.” Some coaches struggle with asking powerful and probing questions. But these were my opinions based upon my study of the topic and experience as a coach; I wanted more time to chew on his question some more and synthesize my thoughts.

In the end, as I look across the literature on coaching and recount my own personal experience, I’d have to say that it appears to boil down to the coach’s approach to the coaching relationship.

Approach 1: If the coach approaches the relationship intent on addressing the coachee’s gaps or weaknesses, then problem-solving becomes the main goal of the coaching interaction. The relationship is built on addressing the coachee’s problems or deficiencies.

Approach 2: If the coach approaches the relationship intent on having the coachee reference past achievements and capitalize on key strengths to achieve a vision for success, then positive change becomes the main goal of the coaching interaction. The relationship is built on positive exploration in service of meaningful change.

What approach is more motivating and inspiring? What approach is more likely to lead to sustained change?

The second—and more positive—approach to coaching appears to be more effective in eliciting individual and organizational change. The evidence is well presented in the text Appreciative Coaching: A Positive Process for Change. Its authors are scholars and experienced consultants in the area of organizational development who have built a coaching model on the core precepts of Appreciative Inquiry. As one of the authors aptly states, “We get more of what we focus on.” Therefore, it would stand to reason: Focus on problems, get more of them. Focus on positives, get more of them.

So, to answer my manager’s question, which is what provoked this blog entry in the first place: Effective coaches are ones that adopt an appreciative approach to change and coach to possibility instead of deficiency.

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by Sherry Engel

Each year, at the beginning of my son’s basketball season, the coach gives a speech to all the parents. He says, “I promise if I have to discipline your child, I will always be fair. But that doesn’t mean that I will treat each child the same.” Now, at first glance, this may seem odd; however, if you examine your interpersonal relationships, you’ll find what works for one, may not work for another. Perhaps a one-size-fits-all approach isn’t the best philosophy to use in all of our interpersonal interactions with co-workers, managers, clients, family members, or friends.

Reflect on some of your past relationships….think about a time you had difficulty relating to a new co-worker or manager. How did you work through that? The key is: If we can understand how a person inherently thinks, feels, and behaves as a unique individual, then we can be in a better position to relate to them. That’s why I’m such a strong proponent of Gallup StrengthsFinder.

Do you know your top 5 strengths? By using StrengthsFinder to identify your top 5 of 34 “themes/strengths” (such as Futuristic, Relater, Analytical, to name a few) and sharing these strengths with others, you can work with them – or simply relate to them – in a whole new way.

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by Sherry Engel

I recently read an article titled Talent Intelligence: Cut Through the Chaos. So much of this article resonated with me. As learning professionals, we have started to talk about measuring the impact of learning.  However, as performance consultants, have we considered the overarching value of talent? This article discusses how to develop a strategy that answers two questions.

1.  What are we trying to impact and improve?

2.  What talent levers can be triggered to affect the desired outcome?

The article examines a Talent Intelligence Framework which when implemented helps organizations more strategically align their talent for business results. 

So how does a company begin implementing this framework? The article outlines the following five steps:

1.   Identify client stakeholders with talent decisions to make.

2.  Beg, borrow, and steal people with sufficient analytic and performance consulting competencies.

3.  Keep HR and non-HR stakeholder’s engagement through the talent intelligence life cycle.

4.  Standardize metrics and analytics definitions.

5.  Pick the most cost-effective tools to deliver metrics and analytics to stakeholders that need them.

Check out the full article! http://tiny.cc/YCd27

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